Here is the poem, and some notes towards an analysis of it. To Althea, From Prison: Convent or cloister for nuns. The speaker asks his beloved not to think harshly of him for leaving her side to go to war. He could not love her as much as he does, he says, if he dishonored himself by failing to answer the call to duty. By sexualizing the elements of war and turning it into a source of alternate pursuit for romantic fulfillment he is currently not receiving, the speaker subtly insults the lover he is leaving—she is a less attractive option than potential death in war.

Stylistically, this is a very simple poem that is comprised of three stanzas, each containing four lines. Lovelace probably implemented this to put an emphasis on how eager the speaker is to get to the battlefield. While the identity of Lucasta is not known, many suspect Lovelace wrote this poem for a woman, Lucy Sacheverell, with whom he was very much in love. True, a new mistress now I chase, The first foe in the field; And with a stronger faith embrace A sword, a horse, a shield. The only thing I would comment on, would be to relate this poem back to the novels you read by David Foster Walace, both thematically and stylistically. Implied comparison of Honour to a beloved woman. This builds your substance as a writer and by using a wide variety of vocabulary, you can address a greater span of audiences.

to lucasta essay

Do you believe most young men today feel the same way as the speaker about answering the call of military duty? Sorry, your blog cannot share posts by email. Privacy Dssay Privacy Policy.

to lucasta essay

The tone of the poem is light and pleasant. To Althea, from Prison by Richard Lovelace. The speaker asks his beloved not to think harshly of him for leaving her side to go to war.

  CASE STUDY SURFPARKS LLC

A Short Analysis of Richard Lovelace’s ‘To Lucasta, Going to the Wars’

Latest Twitterings The important thing is not what the author, or any artist, had in mind to begin with but at what point he decided to tto. He then leaves her ho this bombshell: Of thy chaste breast and quiet mind. Lines 3 and 4 demonstrate the pattern: The theme, then, is that a man sometimes must sweet-talk his beloved in order to get his way. Then tell your classmates and teacher the interpretation with which you agree. Here is the poem, and some notes towards an analysis of it.

Even though he has compared his relationship with war to a new paramour essaay is ultimately more attractive than his lover, he is still, in departure, trying to state that he loves her and is worthy of her respect and admiration, suggesting that his leaving of essa is indicative the honor inherent in his character. Other than that, this was a really great piece! But Lovelace has to leave this refuge of innocence and calm to go and fight in the Civil War.

In the poem, Lovelace defends his decision to take up his sword and head off to battle, arguing with his beloved that it is honour which calls him away from her.

Lovelace To Lucasta essay | Biggest Paper Database

In short, this is a very brief poem that Lovelace wrote about a man saying goodbye to his lover before heading to war. In the first stanza, the speaker is begging his lover not to think he is rude for leaving her. Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new lucaeta by email.

to lucasta essay

The second stanza takes on a different tone essah the first. Posted by Taylor Telford at 7: Another thing you do nicely, not only in this particular essay, but in general as well, is use elevated diction.

  CURRICULUM VITAE EUROPEO COMPILATO ESTETISTA

To Lucasta, Going to the Wars by Richard Lovelace

Lovelace probably implemented this to put an emphasis on how eager the speaker is to get to the battlefield. Lovelace held inherited estates in Kent and freely used his personal eszay to support the king’s causes.

Examples of rhyming sounds within are the following: Loved I not Honour more. He spent multiple stints in jail because of his beliefs.

Analysis of To Lucasta, Going to the Wars by Richard Lovelace

The only thing I would comment on, would be to relate this poem back to the novels you read by David Foster Walace, both thematically and stylistically. By explicitly associated those two, he acknowledges what going off to war will seem like or feel like to the woman and, consequently, any friction between the man and woman is somewhat decreased because he allows her anger.

It was first published in in To Lucastaa collection of Lovelace’s poems. But he is worried that his love will think less of him if he leaves her side. The first foe in the field. This is great because it really builds your credibility and the audience can trust what you have to say. In each stanza the first line rhymes with the third and the second with the fourth. Stylistically, this is a very simple poem that is comprised of three stanzas, each containing four lines. Lux, a noun, means light; castaan adjective, means chaste, moral, virtuous, pure, sacred.